Polish gnocchi - kopytka...

Those little pillow like dumplings are called 'kopytka' in Polish, which literally means 'little hoofs' because of their shape. They are kind of potatoe dumplings, which are hugely popular in Poland. Very quick and easy to make, from ingredients that you probably have already at home.


Polish gnocchi are traditionally made with eggs, but it was really very easy to omit them completely. A bit of oil and cornflour did the trick! Don't be afraid to make double batch, or even triple, as they keep well in the fridge and are freezer friendly.



How to make it...

Ingredients:
- 500 g potatoes, cooked and mashed
- 4 tablespoons cornflour
- 2 tablespoons veg oil
- between 1-2 cups of plain flour
- 1 teaspoon salt

Method:

- Mix the potatoes with cornflour, oil and salt. 
- First add only 1 cup of flour and mix well. 
- If the dough feels too sticky, then add more flour - up to 2 cups in total. 
- The final dough should be like a soft play-dough. You should be able to roll the dough, into long about 1 cm thick rolls and cut into little "cushion" like pieces (mine are usually 1 cm x 1 cm, as they will "grow a little while cooking). 
- Put kopytka into boiling, salted water and boil 1,5-2 minutes from the moment they resurface. 
- Serve immediately. 
- You can keep them in the fridge once they're cooked and reheat them in a frying pan with a little of vegan butter, to give them crispy texture on the outside.

✅ Kopytka are very freezer friendly, once you cut them, spread them on a lightly floured tray and place in the freezer, once frozen transfer into a bag and keep in the freezer until needed. To cook simply boil some salted water, drop still frozen kopytka and simmer for 2 minutes from the moment they resurface. 


Smacznego!


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Comments

  1. these look so completely drool worthy. great work!

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  2. I remember these from cooking with my Babcia!

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    Replies
    1. I cooked them with mine many times too :) and my Mum as well!
      Pozdrawiam, Anula.

      Delete
  3. I just made them and they came out just as I remember from childhood: served with melted butter, sugar and cinnamon. Dzieki wielkie.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you! Sooo good to hear that! It's a taste of my childhood as well! :)
      Pozdrawiam, Anula.

      Delete
  4. Kopytka with cheese are called in polish cuisine pierogi leniwe - "lazy dumplings", and this is a completely separate dish than kopytka. Only the shape is the same, Lazy dumplings are served together with sweet toppings, kopytka are being served with meat and sauce.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Piotr. Thank you for your comment, when it comes to Kopytka (and all "Polish dishes") the "version" of the dish (and sometimes even the name) highly depends on the region of Poland - my Mum is from Silesia, whereas my Nan is from Lubelskie region.
      "Lazy dumplings" don't have potatoes as one of the ingredients, only cheese, eggs, flour, salt (of course all in the right proportions). I came across Kopytka with added cheese many times, though yes, it's usually only mashed potatoes (similar to Italian Gnocchi).
      Lazy dumplings (cheese only) would be normally served with melted butter and sugar, kopytka - with savory accompaniments (which I'm also writing about in the foreword :) ).
      Pozdrawiam, Anula.

      Delete
  5. Anula, if I wanted to use the original eggs and omit the oil how would I do that please?
    Thank you in advance��

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    Replies
    1. Really sorry for replying only now, but your comment went to the spam folder :( So, if you wanted to make more traditional "kopytka" with eggs the recipe would be like this:
      - 6 big potatoes, boiled and mashed, still slightly warm when using
      - 1 egg
      - between 1-2 cups flour
      - pinch of salt
      Again, I'm sorry for the delay in replying to you. Hope you'll find it helpful.

      Pozdrawiam, Anula.
      - pinch of salt

      Delete

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Pozdrawiam, Anula.